“I Have a Dream”

Jobs and Freedom – two words that ring out every single day.

Did you know that Martin Luther King Jr gave his speech on August 29, 1963 at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom?

We obviously can’t help but think of Martin Luther King Jr’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech today – his day of remembrance. But his words are even more appropriate after all that we lived through in 2020 battling a world wide pandemic and struggling with existing social injustices.

It’s been year of daily reports on jobs and freedoms as we contend with:

Balancing safety from the health consequences of Covid-19 for all while maintaining personal and business’s financial security.

Weighing the freedom to make personal choices without negatively impacting others’ well being.

Understanding racism exists and stepping outside our own comfort zones to acknowledge, to heal , and to ask “what can we do” to be better neighbors, friends, and citizens so that everyone may enjoy the same right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

The year 2020 has placed incredible demands on us as a country, as neighbors, as families, and as individuals. The uncertainties have left us scared and being “remote” has left us feeling alone. But, we are not alone. We can come together with determination, collaboration, and HOPE. We can take care of each other. We can move forward. We can create the change that offers everyone the same opportunity to dream and live their fullest lives. WE can do it.

From The Martin Luther King Jr Institute for Research and Studies at Stanford University you can click here Listen to Audio for the speech as spoken by Martin Luther King Jr himself.

I HAVE A DREAM

I say to you today, my friends [applause], so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow (Uh-huh), I still have a dream. (Yes) It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream. (Yes)

I have a dream (Mhm) that one day (Yes) this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed (Hah): “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.” (Yeah, Uh-huh, Hear hear) [applause]

I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia (Yes, Talk), the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.

I have a dream (Yes) [applause] that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice (Yeah), sweltering with the heat of oppression (Mhm), will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

I have a dream (Yeah) [applause] that my four little children (Well) will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. (My Lord) I have a dream today. [enthusiastic applause]

I have a dream that one day down in Alabama, with its vicious racists (Yes, Yeah), with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of “interposition” and “nullification” (Yes), one day right there in Alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers. I have a dream today. [applause] (God help him, Preach)

I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted (Yes), every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain (Yes), and the crooked places will be made straight (Yes), and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed [cheering], and all flesh shall see it together. (Yes Lord)

This is our hope. (Yes, Yes) This is the faith that I go back to the South with. (Yes) With this faith (My Lord) we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. (Yes, All right) With this faith (Yes) we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation (Yes) into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. (Talk about it) With this faith (Yes, My Lord) we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together (Yes), to stand up for freedom together (Yeah), knowing that we will be free one day. [sustained applause]

This will be the day, this will be the day when all of God’s children (Yes, Yeah) will be able to sing with new meaning: “My country, ‘tis of thee (Yeah, Yes), sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing. (Oh yes) Land where my fathers died, land of the pilgrim’s pride (Yeah), from every mountainside, let freedom ring!” (Yeah)

And if America is to be a great nation (Yes), this must become true. So let freedom ring (Yes, Amen) from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire. (Uh-huh) Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York. Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania. (Yes, all right) Let freedom ring (Yes) from the snow-capped Rockies of Colorado. (Well) Let freedom ring from the curvaceous slopes of California. (Yes) But not only that: (No) Let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia. [cheering] (Yeah, Oh yes, Lord) Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee. (Yes) Let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi. (Yes) From every mountainside (Yeah) [sustained applause], let freedom ring.

And when this happens [applause] (Let it ring, Let it ring), and when we allow freedom ring (Let it ring), when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city (Yes Lord), we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children (Yeah), black men (Yeah) and white men (Yeah), Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics (Yes), will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual: “Free at last! (Yes) Free at last! Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!” [enthusiastic applause]Source: 

MLKEC-INP, Martin Luther King, Jr. Estate Collection, In Private Hands. From The Martin Luther King Jr Institute for Research and Studies at Stanford University. © Copyright Information