Stamping It Up with Potatoes!


potato stamp

With so much going on in my kids’ teenage lives these days, simple “throw back” but creative ideas just seem so right.  Click on the photos to get step by step directions on the HGTV website. (Coincidentally their Art Classes at M. Walker Studio are now focusing on print making. Love seeing how their brains work in selecting images and colors to layer together!)

Then…

 

…combine your artwork with a little technology for quick and easy printing to create sets of cards. I just take photos with my phone, upload them to Vistaprint (waiting for a sale of course!) then have cards printed. Order 10 cards for each design you have created then mix them up into sets and give as gifts. Or, have a calendar made using one print per month. Or have them printed on mugs. The possibilities are endless! And how nice to receive a handcrafted item that is also useful!

Jen McMorran Jen McMorran, Realtor
jen.mcmorran@verizon.net
508-930-5259
First Time Home Buyers
Existing Home Sales
New Construction
Antique Homes

Kensington Real Estate Brokerage – Servicing clients from Boston to Providence! North Attleboro, Attleboro, Plainville, Wrentham, Mansfield, Norton, Foxboro, Sharon, Seekonk, Cumberland, North Smithfield, Providence, Lincoln

Revive your Kitchen Cabinets with Paint!

DIY Paint How To’s from my favorite Pro’s at This Old House

Repainted Cabinets This Old HouseIt is a dreary rainy morning here in North Attleboro.  I am definitely moving in slow motion as I clear up the remnants of the morning rush out the door to the school bus and I can not help but focus on my tired  kitchen cabinets in need of, well … “something”.   Reface, replace, repair???  I am definitely ready for something!  Coffee is brewing, kids’ breakfast bowls are away, and the last crumb has been wiped off the counter so it is on to This Old House for ideas 🙂   (My home is an antique colonial built in 1743 and my “home” growing up was an antique built in the 1830’s which is why I have always loved these guys, their magazine, and now their site.  BUT, this is a great site filled with “tried and true” advice for for any homeowner!)

I came across this article on how to paint your kitchen cabinets.  It is a very simple process just make sure you take time with each step – especially preparation!!   And of course,  at the end, accessorizing with new fun hardware can take them up to a how new level of style.  Below is the general overview section of the article.  Click here for the first step and then click “next” in the upper right hand corner to continue on step by step.

Table Illustration Kitchen Cabinet

Illustration: Gregory Nemec

Overview

Painting kitchen cabinets is, like any painting job, a simple task. But mastering the perfect glassy finish is all in the prep work. Before brush ever hits wood, there has to be a lot of time devoted to getting the surface ready to accept paint. That means properly cleaning, sanding, and priming every inch of the surface, or the finish color won’t stick well.

Cleaning is the most important step in the process. Years of greasy fingerprints and cooking splatters can leave a layer of grime that inhibits paint adhesion. You can remove most of the gunk with TSP substitute (a cleaner from DAP or Savogran) or a degreaser—the former if the cabinets are not too dirty, or the stronger degreaser if the grime is thick—but it may take a couple of passes. After that, you’ll need to rough up the surface with some 100-grit sandpaper to help the paint stick.

The primer you use can also make or break the finish. To get a glassy surface, you need to use a “high build” sandable primer, such as Eurolux from Fine Paints of Europe, to best fill the wood and even the surface. The sandable part of that equation is imperative, so that you can smooth the surface before painting on the finish coat. You may even need two coats of primer to completely fill the grain.

To keep the doors and drawers flat as the paint levels, make yourself a pronged drying rack by drilling screws up through several pieces of scrap wood. That way you can flip your work as soon as it’s dry to the touch. Also, screw cup hooks into the edges of doors and drawers so you can grab hold and move them without fingerprinting the paint; then hang them up for out-of-the-way drying.

The formula of finish paint you use contributes to the smooth look. Traditionally, painting cabinets for a high-traffic area such as a kitchen required using oil-based paints. However, working with oils can be messy, and the fumes are toxic. Fortunately, while latex paints will never quite self-level and flow as well as oils, they’re getting close. Latex formulas specified for cabinetry—labeled “100% acrylic”—will create an even, durable finish. And, in many cases, they’re also low in volatile organic compounds, or VOCs, which make that noxious paint smell.

As long as you’re sprucing things up, consider changing the hardware or putting on a faux finish for that added wow factor.